Big step forward for Indian Navy! Joins select group of nations that can locate and provide rescue to distressed submarines

Big step forward for Indian Navy

On Saturday, the Indian Navy joined the select group of countries which have the capability to search, locate & provide rescue to distressed submarines when it inducted the first Deep Submergence Rescue Vessel (DSRV).  These non-tethered DSRV, are capable of carrying out submarine rescue upto depths of 650 meters.

Besides securing our waters,  the Indian Navy undertakes diving operations in the Indian Ocean Region (IOR).

This was announced by the official spokesperson of the Indian Navy Capt DK Sharma on the twitter: that India “joins a select league of nations with capability to search, locate & provide rescue to distressed submarines by induction of 1st Deep Submergence Rescue Vessel(DSRV) & associated kit in fly away configuration which can be rapidly mobilised.”

 The first kit will be mobilised from the naval base in Mumbai, the induction of the second kit has been planned for induction at Visakhapatnam in 2019.

JFD, the world leading underwater capability provider serving the commercial and defence markets, and part of James Fisher and Sons plc, has supplied the DSRV after major trials which will ensure rescue of the personnel in distress.

The DSRV and associated kit in fly away configuration, which can be mobilised immediately. Through an arrangement with the US, earlier, the Indian Navy lost precious time in getting the kit.

The third-generation DSRV in the Indian Navy is a major step- and an important change in real world submarine rescue capability with its weight optimised for maximum payload and optimum transportability.

JFD, the world leading underwater capability provider serving the commercial and defence markets, and part of James Fisher and Sons plc, has supplied the DSRV after major trials.

The 3rd Generation Submarine Rescue Systems incorporate an innovative new system design and tightly integrated components to ensure time-to-first-rescue (TTFR) – the time measured between system deployment and commencement of the rescue – is minimised. In the event of an accident, this maximises the chances of a successful rescue, which is crucial in protecting the lives of submariners.

So far 33 navies around the globe including the Royal Navy, Australian, Singapore, and Korean Navies, as well as NATO Submarine Rescue System use this system.

As reported by FE ONLINE recently, a contract for construction of diving support Vessels (DSV)  was signed by the Indian Navy with Hindustan Shipyard Limited, Vishakhapatnam,  to augment the Indian Navy’s submarine support operations on either coast. To be based at Vishakhapatnam and Mumbai respectively, would be of 118 m in length and of approximately 7,650 T displacement.

 Interesting Fact:

The former defence minister George Fernandes had said in the Parliament  in 2003, that all Indian Navy submarines have the capability to allow escape of crew from about a depth of 120 meters, using escape suits. Submarines have rescue hatches, which are standard fit and are designed to mate with Deep Submergence Rescue Vessels (DSRVs)/diving bells.  Action is being taken to acquire two DSRVs and rescue kits for the Navy.

Source: Financial Express